Down

PROFESSIONS WITHIN THE GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES


Geology has practical applications in civil engineering and in the exploitation of the Earth's resources - building materials, minerals, oil, gas, coal and underground water, and in the impact of extraction and use of raw materials on the environment.

Traditionally, geologists undertook surveys in uncharted areas to collect rock samples that were analysed to detect the presence of valuable minerals. Although geologists still carry out field surveys, continuing technological developments such as the use of electronic devices, satellite imagery and telecommunications have radically changed their work. Functions now usually include interpreting photographs and survey data to produce detailed local maps, selecting sites for surveys and drilling, working with geophysicists to plan seismic surveys, controlling or advising on drilling operations and collecting and analysing materials from drilling.

There are about 10,000 geologists and technical support staff in the UK. Most are employed in the oil and gas industries or work for consultancies that support oil and gas exploration and production.

  1. British Geological Survey
  2. Engineering Geologist
  3. Environmental Geologist
  4. Geomatics Surveyor
  5. Hydrogeologist
  6. Minerals Surveyor
  7. Oceanographer (Marine Geologist)
  8. Oil Geologist/Geophysicist



British Geological Survey

The British Geological Survey (BGS) - part of the Natural Environmental Research Council (NERC) is the largest employer of geologists in the United Kingdom. The BGS conducts surveys to maintain our geological knowledge of the UK and its continental shelf. The minimum requirement for entry at Scientific Officer level is a relevant first degree. The BGS has programmes of training and development for their staff at all stages of their career. Promotion is mainly dependent on the outcomes of annual reviews.

The NERC also employs a limited number of geologists in its other institutions, such as the British Antarctic Survey - see Oceanography below.

For further information, visit their Website.

British Geological Survey
Kingsley Durham Centre
Keyworth
NOTTINGHAM
NG12 5GG

Telephone: 0115 936 3100


Top

Engineering Geologist

For civil engineering projects such as building construction, roads, bridges etc, engineering geologists conduct surveys to assess ground conditions and advise of their possible effect on the construction.

They advise on steps to be taken to avoid problems such as subsidence, landslides and earthquakes, such as suggesting modifications to foundations, choice of construction materials or design.

For further information, contact:

The Geological Society
Burlington House
Piccadilly
LONDON
W1V 0JU

Telephone: 020 7734 4301

Website
Top



Environmental Geologist

Environmental geologists advise on the suitability of sites for waste disposal, on contaminated land and other made-made geo-hazards, for example subsidence caused by old mine workings. Environmental geologists can also be involved in the investigation of coastal and riverbank erosion.

For further information, contact:

The Geological Society
Burlington House
Piccadilly
LONDON
W1V 0JU

Telephone: 020 7734 4301

Website
Top



Geomatics Surveyor

This work involves the precise measurement and mapping of the environment both on land and offshore. The information is used to site new developments, define property boundaries, road building and civil engineering projects on land and the positioning of oil rigs and the routing of undersea cables.

For further information, contact:

The Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors
Parliament Square
12 Great George Street
LONDON
SW1P 3AD

Telephone: 020 7222 7000

Website
Top



Hydrogeologist

Hydrogeologists conduct surveys to identify the type and structure of rock in an area and use this information to evaluate the effects on the movement and availability of groundwater.

This function looks at and assesses areas such as storage potential and flow rates, the effect of extraction on land use, the effects of waste disposal on the quality of groundwater and the likely effects of major excavations such as mines and quarries.

For further information, contact:

The Geological Society
Burlington House
Piccadilly
LONDON
W1V 0JU

Telephone: 020 7734 4301

Website
Top



Minerals Surveyor

Minerals Surveyors assist geologists in the identification and exploration of mineral deposits from gravel or coal to gold and gemstones.

The work involves surveying existing mine workings and valyuing mines, quarries and mineral deposits. They also become involved in mine planning, designing and developing mines and quarries and are responsible for making sure that workings and tips are safe from subsidence and pollution.

For further information, contact one of the following:

The Geological Society
Burlington House
Piccadilly
LONDON
W1V 0JU

Telephone: 020 7734 4301

Website

The Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors
Parliament Square
12 Great George Street
LONDON
SW1P 3AD

Telephone: 020 7222 7000

Website
Top



Oceanographer

Oceanography is the scientific study of the world's oceans. It is usually divided into four main disciplines, biology, chemistry, physical oceanography and geology/geophysical.

Marine geologists and geophysicists investigate the oean floor to find out about its structures, composition and history. They play a central role in the discovery and extraction of oil, gas and minerals from the seabed and can advise on locations for cable laying, pipelines, tunnels and deep sea burial of waste products.

Although Oceanographers spend much of their time in laboratories and offices the role does involve fieldwork, involving up to several months at sea either on research ships or offshore platforms.

For further information, contact one of the following:

Natural Environmental Research Council
Polaris House
North Star Avenue
SWINDON
SN2 1EU

Telephone: 01793 411500

Website

Southampton Oceanography Centre
Waterfront Campus
Universty of Southampton
SOUTHAMPTON
SO

Telephone: 023 80596156

Website
Top



Oil Geologist/Geophysicist

These roles identify areas that could be worth exploring for oil and gas. They use a range of skills and methods, from analysis of data from seismic and geological surveys in the laboratory to spemding time on offshore production platforms analysing rock samples brought to the surface.

For further information, contact one of the following:

Institute of Petroleum
61 New Cavendish Street
LONDON
W1M 8AR

Telephone: 020 7467 7100

Website

Petroleum Science & Technology Institute
Offshore Technology Park
Exploration Drive
Bridge of Don
ABERDEEN
AB23 8SX

Telephone: 01224 706600

Website


Site Map Top
[Research Tools]